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Prevalence and clinical implications of persistent or exertional cardiopulmonary symptoms following SARS-CoV-2 infection…, 2021, Petek et al

Discussion in 'Epidemics (including Covid-19)' started by Milo, Nov 4, 2021.

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  1. Milo

    Milo Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Full title:
    Prevalence and clinical implications of persistent or exertional cardiopulmonary symptoms following SARS-CoV-2 infection in 3597 collegiate athletes: a study from the Outcomes Registry for Cardiac Conditions in Athletes


    Abstract
    Objective: To assess the prevalence and clinical implications of persistent or exertional cardiopulmonary symptoms in young competitive athletes following SARS-CoV-2 infection.

    Methods: This observational cohort study from the Outcomes Registry for Cardiac Conditions in Athletes included 3597 US collegiate athletes after SARS-CoV-2 infection. Clinical characteristics, advanced diagnostic testing and SARS-CoV-2-associated sequelae were compared between athletes with persistent symptoms >3 weeks, exertional symptoms on return to exercise and those without persistent or exertional symptoms.

    Results: Among 3597 athletes (mean age 20 years (SD, 1 year), 34% female), data on persistent and exertional symptoms were reported in 3529 and 3393 athletes, respectively. Persistent symptoms >3 weeks were present in 44/3529 (1.2%) athletes with 2/3529 (0.06%) reporting symptoms >12 weeks. Exertional cardiopulmonary symptoms were present in 137/3393 (4.0%) athletes. Clinical evaluation and diagnostic testing led to the diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2-associated sequelae in 12/137 (8.8%) athletes with exertional symptoms (five cardiac involvement, two pneumonia, two inappropriate sinus tachycardia, two postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and one pleural effusion). No SARS-CoV-2-associated sequelae were identified in athletes with isolated persistent symptoms. Of athletes with chest pain on return to exercise who underwent cardiac MRI (CMR), 5/24 (20.8%) had probable or definite cardiac involvement. In contrast, no athlete with exertional symptoms without chest pain who underwent CMR (0/20) was diagnosed with probable or definite SARS-CoV-2 cardiac involvement.

    Conclusion: Collegiate athletes with SARS-CoV-2 infection have a low prevalence of persistent or exertional symptoms on return to exercise. Exertional cardiopulmonary symptoms, specifically chest pain, warrant a comprehensive evaluation.

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    Trish and Peter Trewhitt like this.

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