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INIM (NSU Institute for Neuro-immuneMedicine) webinar - 'Understanding ME/CFS Today: A Clinical & Research Approach' May 2020

Discussion in 'BioMedical ME/CFS News' started by Sly Saint, May 22, 2020.

  1. Arnie Pye

    Arnie Pye Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Dry nose may occur in Sjogren's Disease. Other possible symptoms in Sjogren's are dry skin, dry mouth, dry eyes and dry ears. Arthritis can occur because of dry joints. I'm sure there are other symptoms, but the ones I've mentioned are all I can remember off the top of my head.

    Edit : There is a product called "Nasogel" which is available (or was) from Boots.

    Code:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/NeilMed-GSP30-ENG-INT-30ml-NasoGel-Spray/dp/B004QDS7UM


    I've bought it and it does help but it was too expensive for regular use for me.
     
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  2. Aslaug

    Aslaug Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    All epithelial barrier tissues have tight junctions, with tight junction protein complexes and a lot of other proteins involved in regulating them. Disturbed tight junctions makes these tissues more permeable to germs and other substances that are not supposed to cross them. I can think of two studies where the epithelial barrier in the gut seemed compromised in ME/CFS.

    The proteins are also found in the blood-brain-barrier and at least here some of the factors that negatively impact them are the same for those found in the gut. If this is the case in the nose I can't say.

    I have intermittent rhinitis, it comes with other flu like symptoms when I get those. But I've a hustory of rhinititis since I was a child so I haven't connected it to my ME.
     
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  3. hinterland

    hinterland Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Amen to that. I'm definitely one with a background of chronic nasal symptoms and related medical history, preceding my ME/CFS. I had allergies and rhinitis from childhood and was prescribed nasal steroid spray and Fucidin cream (an antibiotic cream) from age 14 into my early 20s. I was prescribed Minocycline antibiotics for acne as a teen; then Isotretinoin (Roaccutane brand in UK) as a young adult, which dried out my mucous membranes. I still have chronic nasal congestion, pressure in my sinuses, tinnitus, and feeling of dry, coated, mucous membranes in my sinuses.

    About the one treatment I've found that helps with this (only temporarily unfortunately) is a course of Mupirocin (Bactroban) nasal ointment. This improves cognitive function, hearing, vision, it has a systemic impact to reduce inflammation and joint pain, and increased energy levels. Very interesting!

    I remember Dr White and Dr Shoemaker suggesting something about coagulase negative staph and neurotoxins, and thought something along those lines could be implicated. A toxin or superantigen producing systemic illness.
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2020
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  4. TigerLilea

    TigerLilea Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    I have chronic rhinitis which turned out to be caused by LPR (or silent reflux). When I stick to an acid reflux diet the chronic rhinitis goes away.
     
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  5. strategist

    strategist Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Merged thread

    Surprise Gene Finding Could Give Pathogens and Toxins a Leg Up in ME/CFS
    Some new information coming out of the Klimas genetic study


    https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2020/07/11/mucosal-genes-chronic-fatigue-syndrome/

    Gene names: MUC16, MUC19, MUC22.

    Video here
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 12, 2020
  6. Aslaug

    Aslaug Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    So vulnerable mucus barriers?
     
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  7. strategist

    strategist Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    Not sure. I don't understand how these genetic variants would affect mucus barriers.

    Alterations in MAIT cells, zonulin, LPS and increased intestinal permeability following exertion have been reported in ME/CFS.

    In some ways ME/CFS resembles a persistent infection but nobody can find the pathogens... maybe they're just blending in with normal microbiome and happen to be problematic due to there also being some mucosa and gut barrier problems and whatever the equivalent is for the nose and sinus area.
     
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  8. Trish

    Trish Moderator Staff Member

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    The article is based on the talk by Craddock in the webinar.

    I'm afraid I got distracted by Cort's spelling:
     
  9. Aslaug

    Aslaug Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    The barrier problems could be caused by mucus problems. Some bacteria/viruses/allergens can change the expression and organization of the tight junction proteins that keep the gut epithelium barrier (or skin barrier, or blood brain barrier) together. With a change in the mucus it would be easier for the bad stuff to get access to the epithelium and its tight junction proteins. Since we've been talking about polyuria on another thread, these proteins are also found in the bladder.
     
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