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nature - Long COVID still has no cure - so these patients are turning to research

Discussion in 'Long Covid news' started by Kalliope, Apr 2, 2024.

  1. Kalliope

    Kalliope Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Norway
    Several familiar names in this article.

    quote:

    Getting involved in research is challenging, given the symptoms of long COVID, but many patient advocates say they have no choice. “They’ve got you over a barrel,” says Margaret O’Hara, who coordinates patient involvement in research for a National Health Service hospital trust in England. O’Hara is on medical leave owing to long COVID. Referring to the research, she says: “You have to do it, because you are the one who is going to suffer for it if you don’t, but at the same time, you’re in bed sick.”

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-024-00901-3
     
    rvallee, EzzieD, Wonko and 13 others like this.
  2. Kalliope

    Kalliope Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    6,273
    Location:
    Norway
    Just adding a couple of more quotes:

    RECOVER had come under fire for its plan to test the effectiveness of a computer game for relieving brain fog, which critics say won’t meaningfully reduce symptoms, and for its decision to plan an exercise trial, given that many people with long COVID experience post-exertional malaise.

    “There are a lot of clinical trials that are focused on more behavioural and on non-pharmaceutical interventions, and that is really not a priority to the patient community,” McCorkell says. “It is a misunderstanding of how severe the condition is, and how much of an impact on people’s quality of life it has taken.”

    ...

    From Seltzer’s perspective, an effective collaboration between patients and scientists can help both sides equally, because it leads to more effective and targeted research. “We have the resources to help you do what you do even better,” Seltzer says. The lived experiences of patients can shape research priorities in several key ways, she says. These include finding the most efficient way to allocate limited funds on the basis of symptom burden; offering context on the prevalence and severity of symptoms; and identifying how the trial design can capture improvement most effectively. All of this can help lead to faster breakthroughs in treatments, which is of benefit to both patients and researchers, Seltzer says.
     
    Dolphin, rvallee, Wonko and 7 others like this.

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