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The acceptability of primary care or community‐based behavioural interventions for [PPS]:Qualitative systematic review, 2021, Scope, Moss-Morris et al

Discussion in 'PsychoSocial ME/CFS Research' started by Andy, Apr 7, 2021.

  1. Andy

    Andy Committee Member & Outreach

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    Full title: The acceptability of primary care or community‐based behavioural interventions for persistent physical symptoms: Qualitative systematic review

    Abstract
    Purpose
    Persistent physical symptoms (PPS) are often associated with profound physical disability and psychological distress. Interventions for PPS that promote behavioural change aim to reduce levels of symptoms and improve overall functioning in patients. The evidence for these interventions is mixed, with effective relationships between patients and health practitioners (HPs) reported as the key to the success of primary care interventions. The objectives of this systematic review were to synthesize the qualitative evidence and to evaluate the acceptability of behavioural interventions for PPS in primary care, from the perspective of both patients and HPs.

    Methods
    A comprehensive literature search was conducted in seven major electronic bibliographic databases, to February 2019. The aim was to identify a broad range of literature including, qualitative research, mixed methods research, and qualitative data embedded in trial reports or process evaluations. Fifty‐eight full papers were screened against the inclusion criteria. Nine studies were included and quality‐assessed. A qualitative evidence synthesis was conducted using thematic synthesis.

    Results
    Some patients and HPs reported positive gains from taking part in or delivering interventions, with appropriate support and explanation of their symptoms important for patients. Barriers appeared to be underpinned by the relationship between the patients and HPs, and by beliefs and attitudes held by both parties.

    Conclusions
    Patients should be provided with adequate information to make an informed decision about whether an intervention is appropriate for them, and interventions should not end suddenly or without adequate follow‐up. HPs should receive training and supervision to address their lack of confidence, and improve their knowledge of PPS.

    Open access, https://bpspsychub.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bjhp.12521
     
    Esther12 and Peter Trewhitt like this.
  2. Trish

    Trish Moderator Staff Member

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    So they admit their treatment only works if the patient believes in it, and their solution is to train the therapists to be better at persuading the patients to believe them. Is this medicine, or religion?
     
  3. rvallee

    rvallee Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    "Some people are saying"

    This isn't even pseudoscience. It's pseudo- something but nothing to do with science.
     
  4. alktipping

    alktipping Senior Member (Voting Rights)

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    ffs just replace persistent physical symptoms with chronic disease . see it just fixes all their classification errors .
     
  5. NelliePledge

    NelliePledge Moderator Staff Member

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    I suspect the ‘lack of confidence’ among healthcare providers in communicating this approach could be lack of confidence this is actually the way to be dealing with people
     
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