1. Guest, the 'News in Brief' for the week beginning 21st September 2020 is here.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Welcome! To read the Core Purpose and Values of our forum, click here.
    Dismiss Notice

Tweets from Bhupesh Prusty

Discussion in 'BioMedical ME/CFS News' started by Sarah94, Feb 1, 2020.

  1. Simon M

    Simon M Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    323
    Likes Received:
    5,888
    Location:
    UK
    Good question. I had assumed that was part of the study. On Twitter VP said he was using several different controls, so I assumed it would include the obvious.
     
    Hutan, Kitty, Robert 1973 and 2 others like this.
  2. TigaDua

    TigaDua New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    6
    Prusty tweets about a 'cellular component'.

    Davis has talked about 'something in the blood', and how filtration puts it at around the size of an exosome.

    So, could an exosome (or other extracellular vesicle) be that cellular component? According to Wikipedia, they are a membrane enclosed vesicle secreted by most cells, which can merge with other cells. They can contain proteins, lipids, DNA, RNA and miRNA. Reactivated HHV-6 could go to town and put anything it likes in there. What if it's purpose was to suppress nearby immune cells so that it can spread? (Hanson has recently demonstrated impaired glycolysis in T4 and T8 cells IIRC).

    Right now we're seeing a pandemic caused by coronavirus 2019-nCoV which IIRC hijacks the endomembrane system to secrete copies of itself. So we know that viruses really can mess around at this level.

    Following through this line of thought. If it were an exosome, and if it had unique surface proteins. Well then one line of therapy might be a vaccine.
     
  3. ringding

    ringding Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    330
    Likes Received:
    2,460
    Location:
    Bristol, UK
    The thing that gets me hopeful about Prusty's work is that tie up with the 'something in the blood' discoveries that others had made. Although it's not direct validation they're finding things that seemingly tie up. I hope there's a collaboration in the offing. I know that Prusty has tweeted about discussing things with Naviaux.

    All the detail is lost on me though!
     
  4. Estherbot

    Estherbot Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    185
    Likes Received:
    1,305
    *a 6 minute video on mitochondrial fission & fusion.

    The narrator's accent makes it a little difficult to follow (especially if brain fog is bad)



    *Mentions signal to fuse or break up comes from cell nucleus but narrator says the reasons is unknown (at time of making in December 2012)

    *PS thanks @Simon M for your rather good Facebook explaner
     
  5. Estherbot

    Estherbot Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    185
    Likes Received:
    1,305
    *Another 12 minute video which covers mitochondrial fission & fusion comes from the Physionic podacst.



    *The author is a PhD student whose research covers mitochondria. This broadcast is more recent. (2019)

    *He looks at fission & fusion in terms of mitochondrial DNA. Fusion being a way of removing DNA mutations by being absorbed into another cell.

    *The fission happens after fusion whereby the non defective parts of the mitochondrion which do not have mutant DNA are pinched off.

    *The mutant DNA being retained for destruction.

    *No diagrams but an easier video to follow. The first part is an introduction to mitochondria, the latter part covers fission & fusion.
     
    strategist, Simon M, Andy and 5 others like this.
  6. Estherbot

    Estherbot Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    185
    Likes Received:
    1,305
    Some more background info on mitochondrial fission via an article from Science. You can get a copy via Sci Hub by inputting the DOI

    10.1126/science.1219855

    Mitochondrial Fission, Fusion, and Stress
    1. Richard J. Youle1,*,
    2. Alexander M. van der Bliek2,*
    1. *To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: youler@ninds.nih.gov (R.J.Y.); avan@mednet.ucla.edu (A.M.v.d.B.)
    Science 31 Aug 2012:
    Vol. 337, Issue 6098, pp. 1062-1065
    DOI: 10.1126/science.1219855

    Abstract

    Mitochondrial fission and fusion play critical roles in maintaining functional mitochondria when cells
    experience metabolic or environmental stresses.

    Fusion helps mitigate stress by mixing the contents
    of partially damaged mitochondria as a form of complementation.

    Fission is needed to create newm but it also contributes to quality control by enabling the removal of damaged mitochondria and can facilitate apoptosis during high levels of cellular stress.

    Disruptions in these processes affect normal development, and they have been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s.
     
    ukxmrv, Michelle, Caesar and 5 others like this.
  7. Andy

    Andy Committee Member & Outreach

    Messages:
    10,492
    Likes Received:
    75,826
    Location:
    Hampshire, UK
    Kitty, Michelle, Caesar and 1 other person like this.
  8. cassava7

    cassava7 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    155
    Likes Received:
    1,291
    I hope this went well!


     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2020
  9. 1hullofaguy

    1hullofaguy Established Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    39
  10. Milo

    Milo Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    1,052
    Likes Received:
    7,843
    Bhupesh tweeted this today



    with a follow up tweet that one of them was about ME/cfs.
     
  11. ringding

    ringding Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    330
    Likes Received:
    2,460
    Location:
    Bristol, UK
    Also...

    He goes on to stress it needs validating experimentally.
     
    Michelle, Ron, Kitty and 7 others like this.
  12. Amw66

    Amw66 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    3,854
    Likes Received:
    17,878
    Interesting. I know of a teenager who did private testing via Brakespear and was found to have HHV 6 active, and who is now recovered. Recovery could have been a natural process, but the treatment seems to have accelerated this if so.
     
    Kitty, Invisible Woman and Sarah94 like this.
  13. Jaybee00

    Jaybee00 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    508
    Likes Received:
    2,203
    Is there any evidence for this claim of HHV-6 reactivation in MECFS? I thought Ron Davis’ group found no unusual viruses and no high virus levels. Is this HHV6A or HHV6B?
     
  14. ringding

    ringding Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    330
    Likes Received:
    2,460
    Location:
    Bristol, UK
    I'm pretty sure he's answered questions like that in his tweets but you'd have to dive into his timeline to find them. I think he's sais something along the lines of the viral infection can be localised, so not necessarily showing up in blood tests. Best find his quotes though as I could be talking rubbish.

    ETA: Hopefully we won't have to wait too long for the paper to be published and it'll answer all these types of questions.
     
  15. wigglethemouse

    wigglethemouse Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    807
    Likes Received:
    5,417
    He has a published paper that shows that when HHV6 infects cells a small non-coding RNA (sncRNA-U14?) can be detected.

    He has presented (NIH conference?) that the same small non-coding RNA can also be detected in a large subset of ME patients, but not many healthy controls. So while this does not definitely mean there is HHV6 reactivation, it does hint at the possibility.





    And this tweet mentioned that HHV6A was detected in the Lake Tahoe outbreak
     
    obeat, sebaaa, Michelle and 10 others like this.
  16. 1hullofaguy

    1hullofaguy Established Member

    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    39
  17. Sisyphus

    Sisyphus Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    343
    Likes Received:
    1,223
    Clinical evidence. It’s one of the criteria my doc used to diagnose MECFS.
     
    Kitty likes this.
  18. sebaaa

    sebaaa Established Member

    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    160


    "Trying to conceptualize an RNA-based therapy." RNA-based therapy includes RNAi, and antisense therapy which are both used to silence specific mRNAs. I'm wondering if this suggests that the "something in the blood" is an mRNA or a group of mRNAs specific to HHV-6 or other viruses. Or perhaps silencing a specific HHV-6 mRNA makes it so that the virus can't secrete the "something in the blood."
     
    lunarainbows, Michelle, Kitty and 2 others like this.
  19. InitialConditions

    InitialConditions Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    489
    Likes Received:
    3,101
    Location:
    UK
    I was going to start a new thread but I'll post here instead as my comments concern Bhupesh's tweets. Though I am happy for this to become a new thread.

    Dr. Prusty is clearly exploring engaging with patients over Twitter but some of his tweets have left me confused.

    First, I'm not sure what is meant by this, at all...


    Surely the answer is simply 'publication'. He must know the patient community wait with baited breath for each new publication, and they are widely read. I'm not sure what is implied in the second half of the tweet.


    Second, I'm not sure patients sliding into his DM's is the best way of aquiring data.


    There are responses suggesting he join some private FB groups. Again, I feel this is not the way forward. Is Dr. Prusty a member here?
     
    sebaaa, Milo, Hutan and 5 others like this.
  20. Jaybee00

    Jaybee00 Senior Member (Voting Rights)

    Messages:
    508
    Likes Received:
    2,203
    No comprendo. Damaging *his* scientific career?
     

Share This Page